2014 Trade Secrets Webinar Series Year in Review

19 12 2014

2013 National Year in Review: What You Need to Know About the Recent Cases/Developments in Trade Secrets, Non-Compete, and Computer Fraud Law

The first webinar of the year, led by Michael Wexler, James McNairy and Joshua Salinas, reviewed noteworthy cases and other legal developments from across the nation in the areas of trade secret and data theft, non-compete enforceability, computer fraud, and the interplay between restrictive covenant agreements and social media activity, as well as provided predictions for what to watch for in 2014.

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The content in this post was found at http://www.tradesecretslaw.com/2014/12/articles/trade-secrets/2014-trade-secrets-webinar-series-year-in-review/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TradingSecrets+%28Trading+Secrets%29 and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Former Microsoft employee gets 3 months in jail for leaking Windows 8 secrets

15 12 2014

Earlier this week, a man accused of stealing trade secrets from Microsoft and handing them to a French blogger was sentenced to three months in jail and a $100 fine in the Western District of Washington.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/06/former-microsoft-employee-gets-3-months-in-jail-for-leaking-windows-8-secrets/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Trade Secrets – A Viable Alternative to Patents

14 12 2014

While trade secrets cannot fully replace patent protection in all respects, they do offer a viable alternative to patents for protecting intellectual property in some cases. In addition, while the value of patents in protecting IP has been under attack this year, trade secret protection has been on the rise with, for example, the California appellate court decision in Altavion, Inc. v. Konica Minolta Systems Laboratory, 226 Cal.App.4th 26. 171 Cal.Rptr.3d 714 (1st Dist. 2014) that broadened the definition of what information can qualify as a trade secret. Moreover, there is a real possibility that Congress will finally pass a civil trade secrets protection law, which will mean that trade secrets will not be considered patent’s ugly step sister any longer.

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The content in this post was found at http://www.ipwatchdog.com/2014/12/09/trade-secrets-a-viable-alternative-to-patents/id=52554/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Webinar Recap! National Year in Review of Recent Cases/Developments in Trade Secrets, Non-Compete, and Computer Fraud Law

12 12 2014

By Michael Wexler, James McNairy and Joshua Salinas

We are pleased to let you know that the webinar “2013 National Year in Review: What You Need to Know About the Recent Cases/Developments in Trade Secrets, Non-Compete and Computer Fraud Law” is now available as a podcast and webinar recording.

In Seyfarth’s first installment of its 2014 Trade Secrets Webinar series, Seyfarth attorneys reviewed noteworthy cases and other legal developments from across the nation this past year in the areas of trade secret and data theft, non-compete enforceability, computer fraud, and the interplay between restrictive covenant agreements and social media activity, as well as provided their predictions for what to watch for in 2014.

more

The content in this post was found at http://www.tradesecretslaw.com/2014/03/articles/trade-secrets/webinar-recap-2013-national-year-in-review-what-you-need-to-know-about-the-recent-casesdevelopments-in-trade-secrets-non-compete-and-computer-fraud-law/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TradingSecrets+%28Trading+Secrets%29 and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Amazon sues ex-employee who went to work for Google Cloud

9 12 2014

Lawsuits over “non-compete” contracts aren’t seen often in the tech sector, even though such agreements are commonplace. In part, that’s because such agreements are generally banned in California, where many tech companies are based. The deals are legal in most states, however, so litigation does occur, usually over key employees in hot sectors.

Last week, Amazon sued Zoltan Szabadi, who worked for Amazon Web Services until May, when he moved to a job working at Google Cloud Platform. The lawsuit, first reported by Geekwire, was filed on June 27 in King County Superior Court in Seattle.

 

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/07/amazon-sues-ex-employee-who-went-to-work-for-google-cloud/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.