Record labels say ‘Russian Facebook’ is a haven for music piracy

17 12 2014
Three major music labels—Sony Music Russia, Universal Music Russia, and Warner Music UK, subsidiaries of the “Big Three” music labels—have each separately filed copyright suits on Thursday against vKontakte (VK), the so-called “Russian Facebook.”

The suits, filed in Saint Petersburg and Leningrasky Region Arbitration Court, charged that vKontacke has created an unlicensed music service involving a large catalogue of copyright-infringing music. The labels claim that the social networking site (which boasts 143 million registered users globally, 88 million of whom are based in Russia) has deliberately promoted “large-scale piracy” on its website, according to The Guardian.

The record companies, which focus on a sampling of artists’ work in their suits, seek court orders to remove the infringing material and to require VK to implement content identification and removal measures like audio fingerprinting to prevent unauthorized uploading of infringing materials. The labels are demanding damages of as much as $1.4 million.

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Web browsing is copyright infringement, publishers argue

16 12 2014
Europeans may browse the Internet without fear of infringing copyrights, as the EU Court of Justice ruled Thursday in a decision that ends a four-year legal battle threatening the open Internet.

It was the European top court’s second wide-ranging cyber ruling in less than a month. The court ruled May 13 that Europeans had a so-called “right to be forgotten” requiring Google to delete “inadequate” and “irrelevant” data upon requests from the public. That decision is spurring thousands of removal requests.

In this week’s case, the court slapped down the Newspaper Licensing Agency’s (NLA) claim that the technological underpinnings of Web surfing amounted to infringement.

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Narrow Internet Personal Jurisdiction Leads to Trademark Infringement Case Dismissed

16 12 2014

The United States Federal District Court for the District of Nevada has dismissed a trademark infringement lawsuit against a foreign Internet poker site in a ruling that signals a rather substantial win for Internet businesses at large… Judge Robert C. Jones granted iBus Media Holdings’ motion for dismissal of Best Odds Corp.’s trademark infringement lawsuit. Judge Jones said the plaintiff failed to make a case that Nevada courts had general jurisdiction over the foreign-based iBus Media, citing the Supreme Court’s recent Daimler AG v. Bauman decision, which Jones said ”clarified that the reach of general jurisdiction is narrower than had been supposed in lower courts for many years.”

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Spanish publishers move to halt Google News closure

16 12 2014

A lobby group of Spanish publishers has asked the country’s government to stop Google News from being shut down. Last week Google said it would close its news service after Spain introduced new intellectual property laws that would have forced Google to pay royalties for links to news websites.

Now the Association of Editors of Spanish Dailies (AEDE), the same lobby group that campaigned for the new laws to be introduced, is asking the Spanish government to stop Google News from closing.

In a statement issued to The Spain Report, AEDE said that the search giant had not taken “a neutral stance” and said that it was still “open to negotiations with Google.” The new legislation means that aggregator services such as Google News will be charged to show snippets of content from news publishers. Failure to comply could lead to a fine of up to €600,000 ($745,000).

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/12/spanish-publishers-move-to-halt-google-news-closure/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



German publishers want an 11 percent cut of Google News

15 12 2014

Several of Germany’s largest newspaper and magazine publishers have instituted legal proceedings against Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo. They’re seeking an order that would make the search engines pay them an 11 percent portion of their ”gross sales, including foreign sales” that come “directly and indirectly from making excerpts from online newspapers and magazines public.” That’s according to new media pundit Jeff Jarvis, who published a blog post this morning calling the demands “as absurd as they are cynical and dangerous” and part of a German “war on the link.”

The move appears to be an attempt to achieve in courts what the publishers were not able to get last year through the German legislative process.

The German companies that instigated the arbitration against Google include Axel Springer, Burda, WAZ, the Müncher Merkur. Other major publishers have chosen not to participate, including Spiegel Online, Handelsblatt, Sueddeutsche.de, Stern.de and Focus.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/06/german-publishers-want-an-11-percent-cut-of-google-news/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.