Conflict of Laws Has Caught Up with Silicon Valley. Now Silicon Valley Needs to Catch Up on Conflict of Laws (Guest Blog Post)

19 11 2016

By guest blogger Marketa Trimble

On October 24 and 25, 2016, the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School hosted a conference entitled “Law, Borders, and Speech.” The excellent, thought-provoking conference featured panels of U.S. and international speakers, a number of whom were from Silicon Valley internet companies. Most of the participants have dealt with matters of international conflict of laws (prescriptive jurisdiction, adjudicatory jurisdiction, choice of applicable law, and enforcement) for a number of years. The conference marked a milestone in Silicon Valley’s relation to this field of law, and at the same time might have sent some warning signals to conflict-of-laws experts.

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The content in this post was found at http://blog.ericgoldman.org/archives/2016/11/conflict-of-laws-has-caught-up-with-silicon-valley-now-silicon-valley-needs-to-catch-up-on-conflict-of-laws-guest-blog-post.htm and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



US renews fight for the right to seize content from the world’s servers

31 10 2016
The US Department of Justice isn’t giving up its fight to access content stored in overseas servers. Federal prosecutors in New York late Thursday asked a federal appeals court to reconsider its July decision that allowed Microsoft to successfully claim that authorities had no legal right to access data stored on its servers outside the country, even with a warrant from a federal judge.

A three-judge panel of the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals had ruled that federal law, notably the Stored Communications Act, allows US authorities to seize content in US-based servers, but not in overseas servers—in this case, Dublin, Ireland.

The dispute is an outgrowth of a years-long battle over whether Microsoft must hand over e-mails to New York prosecutors in a narcotics investigation. But the case has broader implications far beyond the drug probe. The case touches on consumer privacy, international relations, and the government’s desire to investigate criminal activity.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/10/us-renews-fight-for-the-right-to-seize-content-from-the-worlds-servers/and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



World Intellectual Property Indicators 2015

12 07 2016

The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) has published its annual World Intellectual Property Indicators.

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The content in this post was found at http://www.wipo.int/edocs/pubdocs/en/wipo_pub_941_2015.pdf and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Germany’s Supreme Court rules that ISPs can be ordered to block piracy websites

16 05 2016
Germany’s Supreme Court has ruled that an ISP can be required to block sites that infringe on copyright, even though the ISP has no relationship with them. However, this is subject to two conditions: before seeking an order that require ISPs to block a website, the copyright holders must have explored all other avenues, for example contacting the operators of the site in question, and the Web hosting company. In addition, Web blocks can only be used for sites which “on balance” have more illegal than legal content. However, the court did not provide any guidelines for how that balance would be judged.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/11/germanys-supreme-court-rules-that-isps-can-be-ordered-to-block-piracy-websites/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



It’s illegal to make private copies of music in the UK—again

16 05 2016
The UK’s 2014 private copying exception, which allowed you to make personal copies of your own music, including format-shifted versions, has now been definitively withdrawn, according to The 1709 Blog. As a result, it is once more illegal to make personal backups of your own music, videos or e-books, rip CDs and DVDs to standalone digital files, or upload your music to the cloud.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/11/thanks-to-the-music-industry-it-is-illegal-to-make-private-copies-of-music-again/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.