World Intellectual Property Indicators 2015

12 07 2016

The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) has published its annual World Intellectual Property Indicators.

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The content in this post was found at http://www.wipo.int/edocs/pubdocs/en/wipo_pub_941_2015.pdf and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Germany’s Supreme Court rules that ISPs can be ordered to block piracy websites

16 05 2016
Germany’s Supreme Court has ruled that an ISP can be required to block sites that infringe on copyright, even though the ISP has no relationship with them. However, this is subject to two conditions: before seeking an order that require ISPs to block a website, the copyright holders must have explored all other avenues, for example contacting the operators of the site in question, and the Web hosting company. In addition, Web blocks can only be used for sites which “on balance” have more illegal than legal content. However, the court did not provide any guidelines for how that balance would be judged.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/11/germanys-supreme-court-rules-that-isps-can-be-ordered-to-block-piracy-websites/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



It’s illegal to make private copies of music in the UK—again

16 05 2016
The UK’s 2014 private copying exception, which allowed you to make personal copies of your own music, including format-shifted versions, has now been definitively withdrawn, according to The 1709 Blog. As a result, it is once more illegal to make personal backups of your own music, videos or e-books, rip CDs and DVDs to standalone digital files, or upload your music to the cloud.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/11/thanks-to-the-music-industry-it-is-illegal-to-make-private-copies-of-music-again/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Blizzard shuts down popular fan-run “pirate” server for classic WoW

7 04 2016
One of the most popular “pirate” servers for World of Warcraft, running a classic version of the game no longer offered by Blizzard, will be shutting down under the threat of legal action from Blizzard.

The Nostalrius servers had been in operation for about a year, running version 1.12 of the original World of Warcraft as it existed in 2006, just before the release of “the Burning Crusade” expansion. The administrators say that 800,000 registered accounts and 150,000 active players were working through quest progressions reproduced to precisely match the game of a decade ago.

But the team behind Nostalrius says its French hosting provider has been issued a formal letter asking it to shut down the servers or face a potential copyright infringement lawsuit. As such, the servers will be shut down on April 10.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2016/04/blizzard-shuts-down-popular-fan-run-pirate-server-for-classic-wow/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Secret Trans-Pacific Partnership accord reached—will IP law change?

18 11 2015
 Arstechnica
October 5, 2015
David Kravets

Eleven Pacific Rim nations and the US agreed Monday to the so-called Trans-Pacific Partnership pact—a secret trade accord backed by nations from Australia to Vietnam.

According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, “The TPP contains a chapter on intellectual property covering copyright, trademarks, and patents. Since the draft text of the agreement has never been officially released to the public, we know from leaked documents, such as the May 2014 [PDF] draft of the TPP Intellectual Property Chapter [PDF], that US negotiators are pushing for the adoption of copyright measures far more restrictive than currently required by international treaties, including the controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) [PDF].”

Negotiating nations include the US, Japan, Australia, Peru, Malaysia, Vietnam, New Zealand, Chile, Singapore, Canada, Mexico, and Brunei Darussalam. Combined, the nations represent about 40 percent of the global economy. The secret accord took more than five years to produce and must be approved by the US Congress. In all, there are 30 chapters, and they won’t be made public for at least a month. Negotiating nations thought it would be better to bargain in secret than in public. There have been leaks, but the citizens of the countries negotiating the pact have deliberately been kept in the dark about it.

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The content in this post was found at http://www.freeforafee.com/?p=111803&preview=true&preview_id=111803&preview_nonce=25faf43359 and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.