Future of Libraries – Need First Sale for ebooks

20 02 2017

How will libraries hold onto ebooks and other digital files like mp3s so that readers and scholars in the future can still read them?  The current state of affairs relies on license agreements with publishers who in turn license to vendors, who in turn, license to libraries.  Hardly sustainable when files can and do disappear when either the publisher or the vendor no longer offer them.

Libraries rely on the right of first sale to lend print books, and need an analogous right in the world of ebooks and digital music. To that end, the American Library Association, the Association of College and Research Libraries, the Association of Research Libraries and the Internet Archive filed a brief on Feb. 14, 2017 in support of Redigi, a company that sells used mp3 files to music customers.  The brief argues that an evaluation of Fair Use should consider the rationale of the First Sale doctrine, and other specific exceptions. It argues that enabling the transfer of the right of possession should be favored under Fair Use.

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The content in this post was found at http://fairuse.stanford.edu/2017/02/19/future-libraries-need-first-sale-ebooks/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Oracle refuses to accept pro-Google “fair use” verdict in API battle

14 02 2017
Google successfully made its case to a jury last year that its use of Java APIs in Android was “fair use.” A San Francisco federal jury rejected Oracle’s claim that the mobile system infringed Oracle’s copyrights.

But Oracle isn’t backing down. Late Friday, the company appealed the high-profile verdict to a federal appeals court.

This is the latest stage of a seemingly never-ending legal battle over intellectual property that began in 2010. The conflict has meandered through two federal trials, in addition to multiple trips to the appellate courts and to the Supreme Court.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/02/oracle-refuses-to-accept-pro-google-fair-use-verdict-in-api-battle/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Creative Commons licenses under scrutiny—what does “noncommercial” mean?

7 02 2017
By all accounts, Great Minds is an educational stalwart that has developed K-12 curriculum used by schools across the US. The materials developed from the Washington, DC-based nonprofit hold US copyrights but are made publicly available under a Creative Commons (CC) license, which theoretically allows them to be freely shared and reproduced for noncommercial uses as long as the original source is credited. That CC license is known as BY-NC-SA 4.0.

But it seems that Great Minds can’t make up its mind on whether it truly wants its materials to be a part of free culture. Or, in the alternative, it’s reading the CC license a little too literally. That’s because it’s suing Federal Express, claiming the Texas-based delivery and copying company is reproducing its materials for teachers and schools without paying royalties to Great Minds. The educational company says that because FedEx is making a profit from reproducing the materials, it’s violating the CC license. That’s according to a federal lawsuit (PDF) the company has lodged against FedEx.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/09/creative-commons-licenses-under-scrutiny-what-does-noncommercial-mean/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Judge allows copyright case on ‘We Shall Overcome’ to move forward, song may be in public domain

1 02 2017

On Monday, November 21st, a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York (S.D.N.Y.) issued a decision allowing a copyright case involving the well-known spiritual song and 20th century civil rights anthem “We Shall Overcome” to go forward. At the center of this case is the question of whether or not “We Shall Overcome” is part of the public domain in the United States, and the recent decision by S.D.N.Y. Judge Denise Cote indicates that the song could in fact be public domain material. “Resolution of the issues of originality and ownership will require discovery and a more developed record,” Cote’s decision reads.

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The content in this post was found at http://www.ipwatchdog.com/2016/12/12/judge-we-shall-overcome-copyright/id=75426/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Cisco v. Arista awaits a jury verdict under the Oracle v. Google shadow

1 02 2017
For the second time this year, two technology giants have clashed in a no-holds-barred legal contest, and the outcome is now in the hands of a Bay Area jury.

Cisco Systems claims that Arista Networks has infringed its intellectual property by engaging in “slavish copying” of its Command Line Interface (CLI), a system of prompts and displays that Cisco uses for controlling its routers and switches. Arista says it’s protected by the doctrine of fair use.

The case has more than a passing similarity to the Oracle v. Google trial that took place in May. During that trial, Oracle tried to paint Google as an IP scofflaw for using parts of its Application Programming Interfaces, or APIs. It didn’t work out, though, when the jury decided that Google’s use of the APIs was justified by fair use.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/12/cisco-v-arista-awaits-a-jury-verdict-under-the-oracle-v-google-shadow/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.