Fail to Register Song – Lose Copyright?

12 10 2017
Dear Rich: I read that the government is planning a song database and songwriters who don’t register will lose all copyrights. Can you explain?

The Transparency in Music Licensing and Ownership Act (TMLOA) is a proposed law that, should it be enacted, would create a song database run by the Copyright Office. Supposedly, the database would make it easier to locate the song owner or PRO. Note:  A song owner does not have to register copyright to provide information to the TMLOA database.
Failing to register. 
Bottom line dept. 

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Digital Resale & Copyrights: Why the Second Circuit Won’t Buy It

12 10 2017

In 2011, ReDigi Inc. introduced technology that effectively attempted to establish a secondary market for “used” digital music files, where owners who had legally downloaded music files from iTunes could sell the music that they no longer wanted.  In a nutshell, the system allowed the owner of a digital file to transfer the music to ReDigi’s cloud storage locker, from which ReDigi could then sell it to a willing buyer for a lower price than the cost of an “original” purchase from the iTunes Store.  When a sale was made, Redigi would retain 60% of the sales price, while the seller and artist got 20% each. Although the process of transferring a file from an owner’s personal computer to ReDigi required that it be reproduced on ReDigi’s server, the system removed the file from the owner’s personal computer as the file was moved.  Capitol Records, the copyright owner of many music files sold over the ReDigi system, sued ReDigi for copyright infringement, alleging that the company reproduced and distributed its copyrighted works without permission.

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The content in this post was found at http://www.ipwatchdog.com/2017/10/11/digital-resale-copyrights-second-circuit-wont-buy/id=88965/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Library trolls copyright zealots by naming collection after Sonny Bono

12 10 2017
The Internet Archive is an online library known for pushing the boundaries of copyright law to promote public access to obscure works, including classic video games and historic images. Now the organization is taking advantage of a little-noticed provision of the 1998 Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act to publish complete copies of out-of-print books published between 1923 and 1941. The group hopes that the move will inspire other libraries to follow its lead, making hundreds of thousands of books from the mid-20th Century available for download.

The Internet Archive has cheekily named this the “Sonny Bono Memorial Collection.” Bono was a musician turned member of Congress who died in a skiing accident months before the legislation passed. His widow, Mary Bono, won his seat in the House of representatives. During the debate over the Copyright Term Extension Act, Mary Bono said that “Sonny wanted the term of copyright protection to last forever. I am informed by staff that such a change would violate the Constitution.” So Congress did the next best thing, retroactively extending copyright terms by 20 years and naming the legislation after Sonny.

Congress passed the controversial law in 1998 under heavy lobbying from major content holders. The law is the reason Mickey Mouse, Batman, and Gone with the Wind haven’t fallen into the public domain—all had copyrights that were due to expire between 1999 and 2017—until Congress intervened.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/10/internet-archive-puts-full-out-of-print-books-from-20s-and-30s-online/and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Did The Walt Disney Company and Pixar Steal the Movie Inside Out?

3 10 2017

Robins Kaplan LLP filed an Amended Complaint detailing allegations that The Walt Disney Company and Pixar misappropriated the central concept and characters behind the animated hit movie Inside Out from a nationally recognized child development expert, Denise Daniels, who had pitched her uniquely original material and characters from her show The Moodsters to top studio executives… Ronald Schutz, partner at Robins Kaplan and lead trial counsel for Daniels and The Moodsters Company, sat down with IPWatchdog to discuss the copyright infringement claims.

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The content in this post was found at http://www.ipwatchdog.com/2017/10/02/disney-pixar-steal-movie-inside-out/id=88559/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Nintendo no longer welcoming YouTube livestreams of its games

3 10 2017
Nintendo’s always-rocky relationship with those that create online videos of its games got worse this weekend, as the company is now barring livestreamed gameplay on YouTube Live from channels that take part in revenue sharing through its Nintendo Creators Program.

“Live streaming on YouTube falls outside the scope of the Nintendo Creators Program,” the company writes in a new note on its Nintendo Creators Program FAQ. “You cannot broadcast content on YouTube Live from the account you have registered to the Nintendo Creators Program.”

Program participants that want to livestream their play of Nintendo games on YouTube can do so on a separate channel or cancel their participation in the revenue-sharing program, the company suggests. YouTube users that participate on a per-video basis seem to be unaffected.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2017/10/nintendo-cuts-off-ad-program-for-youtube-livestreamers/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.