Zynga sues 2 former employees over alleged massive data heist

5 02 2017
On Tuesday, Zynga sued two of its former employees. The company claims they stole confidential information and took it to their new employer, rival social gaming startup, Scopely.

Massimo Maietti and Ehud Barlach worked as higher-up employees for the San Francisco-based Zynga until they left in July and September, respectively. Scopely, which makes Dice with Buddies, Wheel of Fortune Free Play, and others, is also named as a co-defendant in the case.

According to Zynga’s 28-page civil complaint, Maietti was the creative director on “one of Zynga’s most ambitious soon-to-be released games, which goes by the code name ‘Project Mars.’” Barlach, for his part, was the general manager of Hit It Rich! Slots.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/11/zynga-sues-2-former-employees-over-alleged-massive-data-heist/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Top Developments/Headlines in Trade Secret, Computer Fraud, and Non-Compete Law in 2016

1 02 2017

Continuing our annual tradition, we present the top developments/headlines for 2016 in trade secret, computer fraud, and non-compete law. Please join us for our first webinar of the New Year on February 2, 2017, at 12:00 p.m. Central, where we will discuss these new developments, their potential implications, and our predictions for 2017.

1. Defend Trade Secrets Act

2. EU Trade Secrets Directive

3. Government Agencies Continue to Scrutinize the Scope of Non-Disclosure and Restrictive Covenant Agreements

4. New State Legislation Regarding Restrictive Covenants

 

5. Noteworthy Trade Secret, Computer Fraud, and Non-Compete Cases

 

6. Forum Selection Clauses

7. Security Breaches and Data Theft Remain Prevalent

8. The ITC’s Extraterritorial Authority in Trade Secret Disputes

 

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The content in this post was found at http://www.tradesecretslaw.com/2017/01/articles/dtsa/top-developmentsheadlines-in-trade-secret-computer-fraud-and-non-compete-law-in-2016/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



D.C. Circuit Upholds NLRB Finding that Employment Agreement’s Confidentiality and Non-Disparagement Provisions Violated the NLRA

30 01 2017

 

Back in 2013, an NLRB administrative law judge found that certain confidentiality and non-disparagement provisions contained in Quicken’s Mortgage Banker Employment Agreement violated the NLRA (see our earlier blog post here). The Board agreed with the ALJ, and the Company petitioned the D.C. Circuit for review. Recently a three-judge panel of the D.C. Circuit denied the Company’s petition for review and granted the NLRB’s cross-application for enforcement, finding that there was nothing arbitrary or capricious about the Board’s decision and there was no abuse of discretion in the Board’s hearing process (Case No. 14-1231).

Facts

As a condition of employment, mortgage bankers were required to sign a Mortgage Banker Employment Agreement that included a confidentiality provision and a non-disparagement provision. The confidentiality provision prohibited employees from disclosing nonpublic information regarding the company’s personnel, including personnel lists, handbooks, personnel files, and personnel information of coworkers such as phone numbers, addresses, and email addresses. The non-disparagement provision prohibited employees from publicly criticizing, ridiculing, disparaging or defaming the company or its products, services, policies, directors, officers, shareholders or employees.

Court’s Reasoning

….

In finding that the Board properly determined that the confidentiality provision violated employees’ Section 7 rights, the court noted that the very information the provision forbids employees from sharing (i.e., personnel lists and employee rosters) has long been recognized as information that employees must be permitted to gather and share among themselves and with union organizers. With respect to the non-disparagement provision, the court found that the Board “quite reasonably found that such a sweeping gag order would significantly impede mortgage bankers’ exercise of their Section 7 rights because it directly forbids them to express negative opinions about the company, its policies, and its leadership in almost any public forum.”

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The content in this post was found at http://www.tradesecretslaw.com/2016/08/articles/restrictive-covenants/8146/and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Top Developments/Headlines in Trade Secret, Computer Fraud, and Non-Compete Law in 2016

27 01 2017

Continuing our annual tradition, we present the top developments/headlines for 2016 in trade secret, computer fraud, and non-compete law. Please join us for our first webinar of the New Year on February 2, 2017, at 12:00 p.m. Central, where we will discuss these new developments, their potential implications, and our predictions for 2017.

1. Defend Trade Secrets Act

 

2. EU Trade Secrets Directive

3. Government Agencies Continue to Scrutinize the Scope of Non-Disclosure and Restrictive Covenant Agreements

4. New State Legislation Regarding Restrictive Covenants

 

5. Noteworthy Trade Secret, Computer Fraud, and Non-Compete Cases

6. Forum Selection Clauses

 

7. Security Breaches and Data Theft Remain Prevalent

8. The ITC’s Extraterritorial Authority in Trade Secret Disputes

 

more

The content in this post was found at http://www.tradesecretslaw.com/2017/01/articles/trade-secrets/top-developmentsheadlines-in-trade-secret-computer-fraud-and-non-compete-law-in-2016/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Does Google’s Non-Disclosure Agreement With Employees Overreach? (Guest Blog Post)

24 01 2017

Guest Post by Sharon K. Sandeen

In the lead-up to this year’s Presidential election, there was a lot of chatter about the next “bomb-shell” bit of information that might be revealed about Donald Trump, particularly after his now-infamous pussy-grabbing comments. Recently, Tom Arnold, a contestant on “Celebrity Apprentice,” revealed that he is in possession of a video of the President-elect making additional inappropriate comments, but it has not yet been released due to a Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA) that all those associated with the production were required to sign, reportedly including a $5 million liquidated damages clause.

For those who value freedom of speech and the press, and information diffusion more broadly, the fact that an NDA might be used to hide pertinent information about a person who is running for political office (and who is about to become the President of the United States) is very troubling. But the concern transcends political discourse, as a Private Attorney General Act (PAGA) lawsuit against Google, recently filed by “John Doe” in San Francisco, reveals. While NDAs have long been used to protect trade secrets, the central issues posed by the lawsuit concern both the legitimate scope of protected information and, more troubling, allegations that Google uses its NDA to intimidate employees.

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The content in this post was found at http://blog.ericgoldman.org/archives/2017/01/does-googles-non-disclosure-agreement-with-employees-overreach-guest-blog-post.htm and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.