House Republicans urge court to throw out net neutrality rules

4 12 2015
Ars Technica
November 11, 2015
Jon Brodkin
Republican members of Congress urged a federal appeals court to vacate the Federal Communications Commission’s net neutrality rules, saying any such rules should be written by lawmakers instead of the commission.

“Congress certainly did not leave (and would never have left) this issue of great national importance to be decided by the FCC, as it ‘would bring about an enormous and transformative expansion in [the agency’s] regulatory authority without clear congressional authorization,'” 23 Republican representatives led by Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee wrote in a friend of the court brief. (The filing is dated November 4, but it was submitted after a deadline and finally accepted into the record yesterday.)

Congressional Democrats supported the FCC’s rules, but Republicans told the court that the opposing party’s brief “does not represent the views of Congress and in fact is opposed by Members of the majority party in the House.”

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Net Neutrality Activist Tim Wu Probes Broadband Speed Claims

2 12 2015

The Wall Street Journal

October 26, 2015

Jacob Gresham

Armed with subpoena power, net neutrality activist Tim Wu is spearheading an investigation by the New York attorney general’s office into whether broadband companies in New York are promising Internet speeds they don’t deliver.

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EU net neutrality up for a vote next week: Here’s how to fix the proposal

2 12 2015
Ars Technica
October 23, 2015
Glyn Moody
On Tuesday next week, October 27, the European Parliament will vote in Strasbourg on rules that are supposed to protect net neutrality in the EU. The proposed text emerged from the so-called “trilogue” meeting between the European Commission, European Parliament, and the EU Council held in June to reach a “compromise” text taking into account the differing views held by the three institutions. However, there are serious problems with the compromise rules, and in the run-up to the vote next week, digital activists are urging the public to contact MEPs to ask them to support amendments that will fix the main issues.

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Will FCC, Web Players Forge Toothless Neutrality Deal?

3 08 2010

Media Post

Online media examiner

by Wendy Davis,

The Federal Communications Commission, Internet service providers and Web companies “made new progress” on Saturday toward striking a deal about net neutrality, according to a report by industry analysts Stifel Nicolaus.

The report says that the players have reached a “general agreement on some principles,” but no consensus on a few critical issues, including whether wireless service would also be subject to neutrality principles.

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FCC enforcing imaginary laws in P2P ruling, says Comcast

17 08 2009

Almost a year ago, Comcast pledged that it would sue the Federal Communications Commission over its Order sanctioning the cable ISP for peer-to-peer throttling. Now, the company has filed its case with the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Although Comcast’s legal arguments are complex, the crux is simple: there were and still are no statutes or credible regulations that support the Commission’s authority to act on this matter, the company says.

“For the FCC to conclude that an entity has acted in violation of federal law and to take enforcement action for such a violation, there must have been ‘law’ to violate,” Comcast’s Opening Brief to the court contends. “Here, no such law existed.”

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