After cracks, developers remove Denuvo DRM from their games

1 02 2017
How valuable is a digital rights management (DRM) piracy protection scheme after it has been cracked? The obvious answer is “not at all,” an answer that seems to have been confirmed by the removal of Denuvo protection from two popular games, both of which saw that DRM scheme fail earlier this year.

DDOSGaming reports that the 2016 reboot of Doom no longer has Denuvo protection built-in as of an update that went live earlier this week. The move follows a similar pattern to that of Playdead’s Inside, which removed Denuvo protection last month. Inside‘s DRM protection was cracked in August.

 

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2016/12/after-cracks-developers-remove-denuvo-drm-from-their-games/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Browsewrap Agreement Held Unenforceable – Website Designers Take Note!

30 01 2017

In Nghiem v Dick’s Sporting Goods, Inc., No. 16-00097 (C.D. Cal. July 5, 2016), the Central District of California held browsewrap terms to be unenforceable because the hyperlink to the terms was “sandwiched” between two links near the bottom of the third column of links in a website footer.  Website developers – and their lawyers – should take note of this case, part of an emerging trend of judicial scrutiny over how browsewrap terms are presented. Courts have, in many instances, refused to enforce browsewraps due to a finding of a lack of user notice and assent. In this case, the most recent example of a court’s specific analysis of website design, a court suggests that what has become a fairly standard approach to browsewrap presentment fails to achieve the intended purpose.

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The content in this post was found at http://newmedialaw.proskauer.com/2016/07/28/browsewrap-agreement-held-unenforceable-website-designers-take-note/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Batten down the hatches—Navy accused of pirating 585k copies of VR software

27 01 2017
A German maker of 3D virtual reality software is accusing the US Navy of engaging in wanton piracy, and we’re not talking about piracy on the high seas. This is about digital piracy of software, according to a federal lawsuit brought by Bitmanagement Software. The company is seeking copyright infringement damages of more than $596 million (€543 million) from the Navy for allegedly stealing more than 558,000 copies of its BS Contact Geo software.

The amount of damages, if the Navy loses, could go up substantially. Bitmanagement also noted that, in addition to licensing fees, it is seeking pre- and post-judgement interest, punitive damages, legal costs, attorney fees, and statutory damages that could amount to $150,000 per infringement.

According to the lawsuit (PDF) filed in the US Court of Federal Claims:

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/07/batten-down-the-hatches-navy-accused-of-pirating-585k-copies-of-vr-software/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Scraping Lawsuit Survives Dismissal Motion–CouponCabin v. Savings.com

22 01 2017

We blog pretty much every scraping case we see; we just don’t see many of them. As I’ve told you before, scraping is ubiquitous but of dubious legality. Today’s case reiterates just how hard it is for scrapers to win in court if challenged.

The case involves competitors in the online coupon industry. The facts alleged by the plaintiff look very typical for competitive scraping. CouponCabin alleges that Savings.com and several other sites scrape offers from its site, either on an automated or manual basis. In response, CouponCabin allegedly deployed technological blocks against “all traffic, including legitimate users, emanating from certain cloud computing providers and internet service providers identified as being used particularly heavily by the Defendants to conduct scraping activities.” CouponCabin also allegedly sent cease-and-desist letters to most of the defendants. Despite the technological blocks and demand notices, CouponCabin alleges “the Defendants knowingly and intentionally circumvented [the Plaintiff’s] security measures in order to continue their data scraping activities.”

 

Case citation: Couponcabin LLC v. Savings.com, Inc., 2016 WL 3181826 (N.D. Ind. June 8, 2016)

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The content in this post was found at http://blog.ericgoldman.org/archives/2016/06/scraping-lawsuit-survives-dismissal-motion-couponcabin-v-savings-com.htm and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Oculus reverses course, dumps its VR headset-checking DRM

29 12 2016
What a difference an Internet uproar can make.

The Oculus team has reversed course on one of its most unpopular decisions since launching the Rift VR headset in April: headset-specific DRM. After weeks of playing cat-and-mouse to block the “Revive” workaround that translated the VR calls of Oculus games to work smoothly and seamlessly inside of the rival HTC Vive, Oculus quietly updated its hardware-specific runtime on Friday and removed all traces of that controversial DRM.

What’s more, Oculus didn’t mention the change in its runtime update notes, which are curiously future-dated one day forward on Saturday, June 25. The news instead broke when Revive’s head developer posted a note on the project’s Github download page. “I’ve only just tested this and I’m still in disbelief,” the unnamed LibreVR developer wrote. Accordingly, the Revive team has since removed the patch’s DRM-disabling feature, which had later been implemented as an extreme measure to make Oculus games play on the HTC Vive.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2016/06/oculus-reverses-course-dumps-its-vr-headset-checking-drm/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.