DRM in HTML5 is a victory for the open Web, not a defeat

13 03 2017
The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the industry body that oversees development of many Web-related technologies, is again considering the development of a specification enabling DRM-protected media in HTML content. And the group working on Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) is running up against a deadline: the group’s charter expires at the end of April. W3C working groups can only publish specifications with an active charter. So if W3C wants to publish a DRM specification, either the EME proposal must be published as a standard before the end of April or the group’s charter must be extended.

Last year, the working group asked for such an extension, but the Advisory Committee could not come to any consensus on whether to grant it. W3C director and inventor of the Web Tim Berners-Lee last week voiced his support for the EME plan, but the future of EME and the working group’s efforts are currently in limbo. Many of the arguments being made today mirror those made in 2013 when the working group first set about developing EME. And in light of this pending decision, we’re resurfacing the op-ed below (from May 2013) that outlines the supporting view.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/business/2017/03/drm-in-html5-is-a-victory-for-the-open-web-not-a-defeat/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Google open innovation powered by efficient infringement

13 03 2017

Given the growth of efficient infringement, Google can operate in an open innovation way, applying open source principles to patented technologies from outside of the company as well as from those inside the company and partners… If it were not for efficient infringement it would be impossible for one company to be involved in as many different areas of endeavor as Google/Alphabet have attempted. The only feasible way for them to hunt for the next revenue stream seems to be to scatter-shot innovation by going in numerous different directions without any real focus. Of course, that requires them to ignore the rights of others and pretend we live in an open source world without any patent rights. Ironically, it is this disparate and uncoordinated approach to innovating that is also preventing Google from developing any kind of mastery outside of their core search competency and revenue generating model.

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The content in this post was found at http://www.ipwatchdog.com/2017/03/09/google-open-innovation-efficient-infringement/id=78977/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



After cracks, developers remove Denuvo DRM from their games

1 02 2017
How valuable is a digital rights management (DRM) piracy protection scheme after it has been cracked? The obvious answer is “not at all,” an answer that seems to have been confirmed by the removal of Denuvo protection from two popular games, both of which saw that DRM scheme fail earlier this year.

DDOSGaming reports that the 2016 reboot of Doom no longer has Denuvo protection built-in as of an update that went live earlier this week. The move follows a similar pattern to that of Playdead’s Inside, which removed Denuvo protection last month. Inside‘s DRM protection was cracked in August.

 

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2016/12/after-cracks-developers-remove-denuvo-drm-from-their-games/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Browsewrap Agreement Held Unenforceable – Website Designers Take Note!

30 01 2017

In Nghiem v Dick’s Sporting Goods, Inc., No. 16-00097 (C.D. Cal. July 5, 2016), the Central District of California held browsewrap terms to be unenforceable because the hyperlink to the terms was “sandwiched” between two links near the bottom of the third column of links in a website footer.  Website developers – and their lawyers – should take note of this case, part of an emerging trend of judicial scrutiny over how browsewrap terms are presented. Courts have, in many instances, refused to enforce browsewraps due to a finding of a lack of user notice and assent. In this case, the most recent example of a court’s specific analysis of website design, a court suggests that what has become a fairly standard approach to browsewrap presentment fails to achieve the intended purpose.

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The content in this post was found at http://newmedialaw.proskauer.com/2016/07/28/browsewrap-agreement-held-unenforceable-website-designers-take-note/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Batten down the hatches—Navy accused of pirating 585k copies of VR software

27 01 2017
A German maker of 3D virtual reality software is accusing the US Navy of engaging in wanton piracy, and we’re not talking about piracy on the high seas. This is about digital piracy of software, according to a federal lawsuit brought by Bitmanagement Software. The company is seeking copyright infringement damages of more than $596 million (€543 million) from the Navy for allegedly stealing more than 558,000 copies of its BS Contact Geo software.

The amount of damages, if the Navy loses, could go up substantially. Bitmanagement also noted that, in addition to licensing fees, it is seeking pre- and post-judgement interest, punitive damages, legal costs, attorney fees, and statutory damages that could amount to $150,000 per infringement.

According to the lawsuit (PDF) filed in the US Court of Federal Claims:

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/07/batten-down-the-hatches-navy-accused-of-pirating-585k-copies-of-vr-software/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.