Apple must pay $506M for infringing university’s patent

27 07 2017
A judge has ordered Apple to pay $506 million to the research arm of the University of Wisconsin.

Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, or WARF, sued Apple in 2014, accusing its A7, A8, and A8X chips of infringing US Patent No. 5,781,752, which claims a type of “table based data speculation circuit.” The following year after a trial, a Wisconsin jury found (PDF) that Apple had infringed the ‘752 patent and that it should pay $234 million in damages.

Yesterday’s order (PDF), signed by US District Judge William Conley, more than doubles that amount. Conley awarded WARF $1.61 per unit for many of the iPad and iPhone devices that use the accused chips, up until the entry of judgment in October 2015. He also tacked on $2.74 per unit as a royalty payment covering the period from the date of judgment through December 26, 2016, which is when the ‘752 patent expired.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/07/judge-orders-apple-to-pay-506m-to-university-for-patent-infringement/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



State Farm, Allstate and Hyatt among companies targeted by patent owner alleging infringement of online piracy prevention tech

12 06 2017

Venadium LLC filed a series of five patent infringement suits against well-known entities in the insurance, hotel accommodation and industrial supply space. The suits, which have been filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois (N.D. Ill.), feature the assertion of a single patent techniques to combat online software privacy by protecting executable computer programs from unauthorized use.

The post State Farm, Allstate and Hyatt among companies targeted by patent owner alleging infringement of online piracy prevention tech appeared first on IPWatchdog.com | Patents & Patent Law.

The content in this post was found at http://www.ipwatchdog.com/2017/06/12/state-farm-allstate-hyatt-targeted-patent-owner-alleging-infringement-online-piracy-prevention-tech/id=83915/and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Trademark Registrations for Emojis

12 06 2017

[This is another excerpt from my Emojis and the Law paper.]

The Trademark Office has registered emoji trademarks. On January 20, 2017, I conducted a search in the TESS database for “emoji” and identified 385 records. At that time, most of those are pending trademark applications; I counted only 62 actual registrations. Of those, most are word marks with no design elements; and the few with design elements usually incorporated an emoji within the design rather than constituting an actual emoji itself. Still, I found a couple of trademark registrations of emojis, including:

Registration No. 5048843 (Sept. 27, 2016) for a key emoji:

key emoji

 

 

 

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The content in this post was found at http://blog.ericgoldman.org/archives/2017/06/trademark-registrations-for-emojis.htm and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Two articles on the business of Right of Publicity

12 06 2017

Two informative articles have issued in the last week, on the heels of the 2017 Licensing Show.  Both are informative and include input from industry leaders.

Forbes:   Forbes Business of Deceased Icons

and Huffington Post:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/592fa717e4b00afe556b0b27

Delebrities

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The content in this post was found at http://rightofpublicity.com/two-articles-on-the-business-of-right-of-publicity and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



DMCA “safe harbor” up in the air for online sites that use moderators

28 05 2017
The Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s so-called “safe harbor” defense to infringement is under fire from a paparazzi photo agency. A new court ruling says the defense may not always be available to websites that host content submitted by third parties.

The safe harbor provision is what has given rise to sites like YouTube and various social media platforms. In essence, safe harbor was baked into the DMCA to allow websites to be free from legal liability for infringing content posted by their users—so long as the website timely removes that content at the request of the rights holder.

But a San Francisco-based federal appeals court is ruling that, if a website uses moderators to review content posted by third parties, the safe harbor privilege may not apply. That’s according to a Friday decision in a dispute brought by Mavrix Photographs against LiveJournal, which hosts the popular celebrity fan forum “Oh No they Didn’t.” The site hosted Mavrix-owned photos of Beyonce Knowles, Katy Perry, and other stars without authorization.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/04/dmca-safe-harbor-up-in-the-air-for-online-sites-that-use-moderators/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.